Positions available

Two Postdoctoral Positions, Yale School of Medicine
Photobiology of Chemiexcitation

This NIH-funded project explores the biological chemistry and photobiology of a new mode of skin disease – chemiexcitation, the chemical excitation of electrons to a high-energy state (Science 347:842, 2015). Projects include determining the photo-enzymatic signaling steps that initiate chemiexcitation, the range of enzymes that can participate, the biochemical steps by which NO• and O2•– chemiexcite melanin, and identification of other molecules that can host chemiexcitation. A related project uses next-generation DNA sequencing to measure DNA photoproducts at UV-sensitive genomic sites, as a prelude to predicting cancer risk.
One candidate will be a molecular biologist with DNA experience (mammalian tissue culture, DNA isolation, ligation, PCR, ELISA, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry); the other will have a more biochemical background (HPLC/MS, NMR, enzymology). Both will be highly motivated and have an interest in photochemistry or excited states, the ability to think about new problems, and published or in-press papers. Candidates must have a Ph.D. degree (or equivalent) with 0-2 years of postdoctoral experience; fluent technical English is required.
The techniques/tools involved include (1) the use of pulsed femtosecond lasers to perturb cells, (2) the use of super-resolution microscopes to monitor cell response, and (3) the design, characterization, and incorporation of optogenetic proteins in live cells.

Interested candidates should email their curriculum vitae, contact information for three references, and a cover letter describing the aspects of the project that most interest them and relevant expertise, to
Dr. Douglas Brash, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine
douglas.brash@yale.edu
Yale is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


Ph.D. Stipends Available – Department of Chemistry, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark
Controlling and Characterizing the Behavior of Singlet Oxygen in Mammalian Cells

Issues pertinent to the roles played by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in live cells will be studied. Singlet oxygen is a ROS that is important in processes that range from cell death to cell proliferation. It can diffuse over a finite distance in a cell and, as such, is a unique signaling agent. Messages are sent, for example, through its reactions with cellular proteins.
The project focusses on methods to (1) control singlet oxygen production using optogenetic photosensitizers, (2) monitor cell response using microscope-based techniques, and (3) quantify the pertinent photophysical and photochemical processes.
The techniques/tools involved include (1) the use of pulsed femtosecond lasers to perturb cells, (2) the use of super-resolution microscopes to monitor cell response, and (3) the design, characterization, and incorporation of optogenetic proteins in live cells.

Those with interests that range from Physical Chemistry to Molecular Biology are encouraged to contact:
Peter R. Ogilby, Department of Chemistry, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark
progilby@chem.au.dk
www.chem.au.dk/ppp